History of Early Modern Science

Upcoming Meetings

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There are no currently scheduled upcoming events.


Past Meetings

  • April 7, 2017

    "A Second Look: Leviathan and the Air Pump," published in Isis, volume 108, No. 1, March 2017. 


  • February 3, 2017

    Readings included a recent essay review from Isis by John Henry, a chapter from David Wootton's Invention of Science, and some extracts from Floris Cohen's Rise of Modern Science Explained.


  • December 2, 2016

    Bob Westman of UCSD and André Goddu of Stonehill College discussed with group participants their recent work on Copernicus.

    Robert S. Westman, Copernicus and the Astrologers, Dibner Library Lecture, December 12, 2013, Smithsonian Libraries. (Available here.)

    André Goddu, “Ludwik Antoni Birkenmajer and Curtis Wilson on the Origin of Nicholas Copernicus’s Heliocentrism,” Isis, v 107, no 2, June 2016, pp. 225-253. (DOI: 10.1086/687031)


  • October 21, 2016

    Participants in Consortium Working Groups attended remotely a symposium held at the University of Minnesota. The symposium will produce a special issue of the Journal of Early Modern History on the topic "Beyond the 'Scientific Revolution:' Thinking Globally about the History of Modern Science." The presenters were:Jorge Canizares Esguerra, UT Austin Hal Cook, Brown Harun Küçük, UPenn Carla Nappi, UBC Ahmed Ragab, Harvard Kapil Raj, EHESS Paris Daniela Bleichmar, USC JB Shank, UMN Program and details


  • April 14, 2016

    The group discussed Peter Dear's "Afterword" for the Palgrave Handbook of Literature and Science and Mary Baine Campbell's chapter on "Literature" from The Cambridge History of Science: Volume 3, Early Modern Science (2006), edited by Katharine Park and Lorraine Daston.


  • March 10, 2016

    We read the first two chapters from David Wootton's recent book, The Invention of Science, L. Daston's review (from the Guardian), and A. Wulff's review (from the Financial Times).


  • November 12, 2015

    The group discussed Kleber Cecon's "Chemical Translation: The Case of Robert Boyle's Experiments on Sensible Qualities," Annals of Science, Vol. 68, No. 2, April 2011, pp. 179-198, as well as Pamela Smith's "In the Workshop of History: Making, Writing, and Meaning," West 86th, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Spring-Summer 2012), pp 4-31.


  • October 7, 2015

    The group joined the "Science Beyond the West" group for a special event: Dimitri Gutas and H. Floris Cohen discussed Cohen's recent book, How Modern Science Came Into the World: Four Civilizations, One 17th-Century Breakthrough (Amsterdam University Press, 2011).


  • April 9, 2015

    Planning meeting for 2015-2016


  • March 12, 2015

    Sue Wells of Temple University introduced her draft chapter, "'The Anatomy of Melancholy' and Early Modern Medicine."


Group Conveners

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  • mpiorko1's picture

    Megan Piorko

    Megan Piorko is a postdoctoral fellow at the Science History Institute. She previously held a dissertation fellowship at the Consortium for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine. Her research is on 17th century alchemical texts, at the intersection of the history of science and book history. She also serves as the Communications Editor to the Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry. 

     

  • KReinhart's picture

    Katherine Reinhart

    Katherine Reinhart is the Consortium's 2019-2020 NEH Postdoctoral Fellow. She holds a Ph.D. in history of art from University of Cambridge. Her book project examines the epistemic and political functions of images in a pivotal early modern scientific institution – the Académie royale des sciences, the first scientific academy in France. It reveals how various types of visual material – from anatomical drawings to allegorical reliefs on coins – were an indispensible part of the Academy’s projects, as well as providing tangible evidence of the scientific ambitions of the French state. 

     

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