Working Groups

Medicine and Health

The History of Medicine and Health Working Group meets monthly to discuss a colleague’s work in progress or to discuss readings that are of particular interest to participants.

Meetings are usually held from 3:30 to 5:00 on first Fridays.

Scholars can participate online, or at the Consortium offices in Philadelphia, 431 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106, or at the New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue (@ 103rd Street), New York, NY 10029.

To join this working group, click "Request group membership" at right. You will receive instructions for participating online or in person.

  • dbarnes's picture

    David Barnes

    David Barnes teaches history of medicine and public health at UPenn. His interests include history of medicine and public health, cultural history of bodily knowledge, and bodily practices.

     

  • ptheerman's picture

    Paul Theerman

    Paul Theerman is Director of the Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health at the New York Academy of Medicine.

     

  • ntomes's picture

    Nancy Tomes

    Nancy Tomes is Distinguished Professor of History at Stony Brook University. Her research interests include U.S. social and cultural history and the history of medicine, women, and gender.

     

  • kwailoo@princeton.edu's picture

    Keith Wailoo

    Keith Andrew Wailoo is Townsend Martin Professor of History and Public Affairs at Princeton University. His research and teaching interests include the history and cultural politics of disease; drugs and drug policy; race, science, and health; and health policy and medical affairs in the U.S.

     

Upcoming Meetings (all times Eastern)

There are no currently scheduled upcoming events.

Past Meetings

  • April 15, 2016

    Dora Vargha (Birkbeck College, University of London, and 2015–2016 Consortium for HSTM Research Fellow) will present “After the End of Polio: Local and Global Consequences of Disease Elimination.” Daniel Wilson (Mulhenberg College) will provide commentary to start the discussion.

  • March 18, 2016

    Alex Mold (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and Nancy Tomes (Stony Brook University) discussed their recently published books on patient consumerism in the UK (Making the Patient-Consumer, Manchester, 2015) and the US (Remaking the American Patient, UNC Press, 2016), and Roberta Bivins (University of Warwick) provided comments to start the discussion.

  • February 19, 2016

    Wendy Kline (Purdue University) shared a chapter from her book-in-progress, Coming Home: Medicine, Midwives, and the Transformation of Birth in Late-Twentieth-Century America. Judith Walzer Leavitt (U. Madison at Wisconsin) and Barbara Katz Rothman (Baruch College/CUNY Graduate Center) provided commentary and the group discussed.

  • December 18, 2015

    Heidi Knoblauch of Bard College joined the group to discuss her paper, "Collecting Patients: Clinical Photographs, Record Keeping, and Privacy in the United States, 1862-1939."

  • October 30, 2015

    Joseph Gabriel (University of Wisconsin) and Jeremy Greene (Johns Hopkins University) discussed each other's books. The group read excerpts from Joe's Medical Monopoly:Intellectual Property Rights and the Origins of the Modern Pharmaceutical Industry and Jeremy's Generic: the Unbranding of Modern Medicine. Lawrence Glickman (Cornell University) gave comments, and then the group discussed.

  • April 17, 2015

    A discussion between two authors who have recently written books about pain: Keith Wailoo, the author of Pain: A Political History, and Joanna Bourke, the author of The Story of Pain: From Prayer to Painkillers. Keith commented on Joanna's book, Joanna on Keith's, followed by questions and discussion from all seminar participants.

  • March 20, 2015

    The group discussed a draft paper by Christopher Willoughby of Tulane University, entitled "Running Away from Drapetomania: Samuel Cartwright, Medicine, and Race in the Antebellum South." Sharla Fett of Occidental College and Michael Sappol of the National Library of Medicine provided commentary to start the discussion.

  • January 16, 2015

    James Colgrove of Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health, Shobana Shankar of Stony Brook and David Barnes of UPenn discussed the Ebola epidemic in historical context.

  • May 6, 2014

    Deanna Day of UPenn introduced her paper "'As Modern As Tomorrow': Toward a History of the Medicine Cabinet as Architectural Innovation and Ontological Category."

  • April 1, 2014

    Julia Mansfield of Stanford University and PACHS introduced her paper, "Restoring Civility to Commerce: Samuel Mitchill's Response to Quarantine in the Napoleonic Age."

  • Membership