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1Title:  Oral history interview with Bernard N. Fields 1992 December 8   
 Creator:  Fields, Bernard N. | Schlesinger, Sondra | Chemical Heritage Foundation 
 Notes:  Interviewed conducted by Sondra Schlesinger. Bernard Fields begins the interview with a discussion of his early years, growing up in Brooklyn, New York. Fields was encouraged by his parents to excel in scholastic endeavors. After graduating high school at the age of sixteen, Fields enrolled at Brandeis University. After a mediocre start, he finished college at the top of his class, receiving an A.B. in biology in 1958. Fields loved biology and wanted to become an M.D. He attended New York University School of Medicine, earning his M.D. in 1962. While at NYU, Fields first became interested in neuroscience and how diseases affect the central nervous system. He then received an internship with Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, where he became involved in infectious diseases. After completing his doctoral training, Fields took a fellowship in infectious diseases with Mort Swartz at Massachusetts General Hospital. Infectious diseases fascinated Fields and he began to move toward a career in microbiology and virology. In 1967, after two years of military service in Atlanta, Georgia, with the Centers for Disease Control, Fields moved back to New York with his new wife and three stepchildren, accepting a research fellowship with Wolfgang K. Joklik at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. While at Einstein, Fields began research on Reovirus, which would become one of his life-long research projects. His research focused on the genetics of Reovirus and how the virus interacted with animal cells. In 1969, Fields became Associate Professor of Medicine and Cell Biology at Einstein, and held that position until 1975, when he joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School as Head of Infectious Diseases. With his research fellows, Fields studied different strains of Reovirus and how they mutated to cause different diseases. Fields became Chairman of the Microbiology and Molecular Genetics Department at Harvard in 1982, ending his extensive research in infectious diseases just as AIDS hit the world scene. Fields concludes the interview with a discussion of the future of biological research, developing working relationships with students, and his personal battle with pancreatic cancer. 
 Extent:  cassettes. 
 Subjects:  Fields, Bernard N. -- Interviews | Albert Einstein College of Medicine -- Faculty | Harvard Medical School -- Faculty | National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.) | Microbiologists -- Biography | Microbiologists -- Interviews | Biochemists -- Interviews | Biochemists -- Biography | Biochemistry | Microbiology | Biology | Virology | Virology -- Research | Molecular biology | Immunology | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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2Title:  Oral history interview with Ronald A. Milligan, 1992 October 22, 24 and December 17   
 Creator:  Milligan, Ronald Andrew | Hathaway, Neil D. | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Neil D. Hathaway at Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Ronald A. Milligan grew up on a farm outside of Londonderry, Northern Ireland. He had been interested in biology all through his childhood, and when a school trip to Queens University in Belfast exposed him to bacteriology, he decided he wanted to study botany and bacteriology. His scores admitted him to the University of Leeds. He had made the decision to be a research scientist earlier, though he does not remember how he learned what a scientist did. Milligan was graduated with a lower second-class honors degree and began to hunt for a job. He took a position as a research assistant at the Nuffield Institute of Comparative Medicine at the London Zoo, where he studied botulism and bovine pleuropneumonia. From there he became a research assistant at the Medical Research Council (MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, going to work on nuclear pore complex (NPC) in Nigel Unwins lab. When Unwin was recruited to Stanford, Milligan went along as a graduate student. Here Milligan discusses Unwin's reasons for leaving MRC and his [Unwin's] own experiences at Stanford. Milligan goes into detail about his work on low-temperature ribosome crystallization and how electron microscopes damage specimens. He spent three months in Heidelberg, Germany, studying cryo-electron microscopy; his results allowed him to acquire independence as a researcher. Milligan talks about his NPC research, grantsmanship, and {28}safe science. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Milligan, Ronald Andrew | Unwin, Nigel | Laboratory of Molecular Biology | Scripps Research Institute -- Faculty | Molecular biologists -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Microscopy -- Research | Molecular biology -- Research | Myosin -- Research | Nuclear membranes -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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3Title:  Oral history interview with Fenyong Liu, 2005 November 1-3   
 Creator:  Liu, Fenyong, 1964- | Mejia, Robin | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Robin Mejia at University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Fenyong Liu was born and raised in Guangzhou, China during the Cultural Revolution. After passing the university entrance examinations, Liu matriculated at the prestigious University of Science and Technology of China. Initially he decided to pursue physics, but then transferred to the biology program after two years of study. Encouraged by his professors, Liu decided to attend graduate school in the United States at the University of Chicago, briefly spending time in the Medical School before transferring into the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program, where he worked with Richard Roller and Bernard Roizman. While his initial research focused on the biochemistry of viral DNA replication, Liu focused in the last years of his doctoral study on the genetics of the herpes virus capsid protein; his research resulted in a patent and created intense interest from the pharmaceutical industry. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Liu, Fenyong, -- 1964- | Altman, Sidney | Roizman, Bernard, -- 1929- | University of California, Berkeley -- Faculty | Molecular biologists -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Molecular biology -- Research | Communicable diseases -- Research | Genetics -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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4Title:  Oral history interview with Michael J. Overduin, 2005 February 8-9   
 Creator:  Overduin, Michael J. | Van Benschoten, William | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by William Van Benschoten at University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Michael J. Overduin was born in Ontario, Canada, the second oldest of five children. As a child Overduin was interested in music (though never performed) and art, and he appreciated the creativity of science. His interests and his parents belief in education cultivated his love of biology and nature; influential teachers in school and early laboratory experiences proved formative as well. Overduin matriculated at Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada and pursued a major in biology and a minor in mathematics. While in college he completed a thesis with Bernard Glick on the transformation of Pseudomonas aeroginosa and Esherichia coli by electroporation. After receiving his baccalaureate of science, he chose to attend Rockefeller University for graduate studies in structural biology, working in the laboratory of David Cowburn. Overduins graduate work used nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the structure of a signal transduction protein; additionally, he worked with David Baltimore. For his postdoctoral fellowship, he worked with Mitsuhiko Ikuraat the University of Toronto and focused on the structural protein cadherin and its involvement in cell adhesion. After his time in Toronto, he accepted a position at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and began research on the domain structure of receptors involved in endocytosis. He also assisted in establishing an NMR spectroscopy facility and biomolecular structure program while there. After several years at Colorado, he moved to the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England, helping build the NMR spectroscopy facility there, and continuing his research on complex systems and protein domains of therapeutic targets. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Overduin, Michael J | University of Birmingham -- Faculty | Molecular biologists -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Interviews | Molecular biologists -- Great Britain -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Great Britain -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Great Britain -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Great Britain -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Medicine -- Research -- Great Britain | Molecular biology -- Research | Molecular biology -- Research -- Great Britain | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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6Title:  Oral history interview with Frank J. Rauscher, III 1996 October 7-9   
 Creator:  Rauscher, F. J., (Frank Joseph)III, 1957- | Maestrejuan, Andrea R. | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Andrea R. Maestrejuan at Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Frank J. Rauscher, III grew up near Washington, DC His father was director of the National Cancer Institute, to which Rauscher attributes his early interest in biology. He attended Moravian College, spending breaks in labs at Columbia University and Yale-New Haven Hospital. Next, Rauscher entered Edwin Cadman's lab as a technician. Interested in molecular biology and oncogene research, he entered graduate school at SUNY Buffalo, where he studied the interaction of drugs and chromatin. During a postdoc in the Tom Curran lab at Roche Institute of Molecular Biology, his research focused on the fosoncogene. Finally, Rauscher set up his lab as an assistant professor at the Wistar Institute. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Rauscher, F. J., -- III -- (Frank Joseph), -- 1957- | Cadman, Edwin C | Curran, Thomas -- 1956- | Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology -- Faculty | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Molecular biologists -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Cancer -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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7Title:  Oral history interview with Frank A. Laski 1993 May 13 and 1994 May 19, 26   
 Creator:  Laski, Frank Allen | Novak, Steven J., 1947- | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Steven J. Novak at University of California, Los Angeles, California. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Frank A. Laski was born in Detroit, Michigan. He discovered in high school that he liked science. He attended the University of Michigan, where he obtained a BS in general studies, a major that allowed him to concentrate on science; he worked in Ethel Noland Jacksons lab as an undergraduate. He became very excited about recombinant DNA and knew that his future lay with genetics. Laski entered Massachusetts Institute of Technology for his Ph.D. He worked there in Phillip A. Sharps lab, where he learned to clone adenovirus; spliced introns; and eventually passed his oral exams. After receiving his Ph.D. he took a postdoc in Gerald M. Rubins lab at the University of California at Berkeley, working on the relationship between P elements and germline tissue. He then accepted an assistant professorship at the Department of Biology and at the Molecular Biology Institute at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he remains today. His work encompasses bacteriophage packaging; transfer RNA; Drosophila ovaries; P elements; oogenesis; and genetic mutations in Drosophila. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Laski, Frank Allen | Rubin, Gerald | Sharp, Phillip A | Molecular biologists -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Molecular biology -- Research | Genetics -- Research | Proteins -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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8Title:  Oral history interview with Timothy J. McDonnell 1996 June 17-19   
 Creator:  McDonnell, Timothy J. | Novak, Steven J., 1947- | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Steven J. Novak at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Timothy J. McDonnell spent his first six years in Indiana and Spain; then the family moved to San Diego, California. McDonnell was always fascinated with the natural world, wanting first to be a veterinarian and later a herpetologist or an oceanographer; he even worked as a bat bander for a time. He attended public schools; his grade school was very good, but his junior high and high schools less so. In fact, he felt his performance worsened the longer he stayed in school, so after his sophomore year he left high school without having been graduated and entered the United States International University. There he majored in biology, which he continued when he transferred to University of California, San Diego, although his interest shifted from organismic to cellular biology, as exemplified particularly by an interest in the causes of cancer. McDonnell then attended graduate school at the University of North Dakota, where he taught anatomy in addition to doing his own research. He entered the John O. Oberpriller laboratory; there his research on cardiac muscle demonstrated that differentiated cells are not necessarily postmitotic. After receiving his Ph.D., McDonnell stayed at the University of North Dakota to study for an M.D. degree. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  McDonnell, Timothy J | Pathologists -- Biography | Pathologists -- Interviews | Molecular biologists -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Cancer -- Research | Hematopoietic system -- Cancer -- Research | Molecular biology -- Research | Pathology, Molecular -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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9Title:  Oral history interview with Samuel L. Pfaff, 2005 October 3-5   
 Creator:  Pfaff, Samuel | Mejia, Robin | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Robin Mejia at Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Samuel L. Pfaff was born and raised in Rochester, Minnesota. He received a public education and felt fortunate to have a fifth grade teacher who recommended him for accelerated academic work and to have a high school biology teacher who suggested he volunteer in a Mayo Clinic laboratory, subsequently contacting Dr. Peter Dyck at Mayo on Pfaff's behalf. In Dyck's neurology lab, Pfaff contributed to Dr. Jeff Yao's research on Wallerian degeneration (the degeneration of nerves after injury); he presented his work at local, state, and, finally, National Science Fairs and because of it also won awards from the U.S. Navy and the state of West Virginia to attend a navy-themed camp in Hawaii and a science camp in West Virginia. He decided to attend a local college for his undergraduate degree, matriculating at Carleton Collegea liberal arts school about forty minutes from his home. Dr. Ross Shoger's class in developmental biology proved quite influential and Pfaff chose to pursue a doctoral degree in the sciences over a medical degree. He entered the University of California system for graduate school, studying at Berkeley with Peter Duesberg whose lab focused on how oncogenes functionworking with retroviruses, RNA viruses, that could be grown on cells (mostly on chick embryos) which then led to a transformation of the cells and over proliferationthough this was slightly before Duesberg's public claims that the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was not the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). From Berkeley Pfaff went on to undertake a postdoctoral fellowship in developmental molecular biology with William Taylor at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, and then another with Thomas M. Jessell at Columbia University in New York, New York, working on molecular neurobiology and gene regulation of motor neuron development. After his postdoc he moved on to a position at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, researching gene combinations for regulation of motor neurons in spinal cord development. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Pfaff, Samuel | Jessell, Thomas M | Salk Institute for Biological Studies -- Faculty | Neuroscientists -- Biography | Neuroscientists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Neurosciences -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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10Title:  Oral history interview with Joshua Lederberg 1992 June 25, July 7, and December 9   
 Creator:  Lederberg, Joshua | Bohning, James J. | Chemical Heritage Foundation 
 Notes:  Interview conducted by James J. Bohning at Rockefeller University. Joshua Lederberg begins the three-part interview with a description of his parents, family background, and early years in New York. Lederberg knew from the second grade that he wanted to be a scientist, and he experimented at home with his own chemistry lab. Lederberg cites Albert Einstein as being a positive role model in his formative years. After completing grade school in 1936, he attended the Palestine Conference with his father in Washington, DC. He graduated from Stuyvesant High School at age fifteen. Due to age restrictions, Lederberg had to wait until he was sixteen before entering Columbia University. He spent the semester between high school and college at the American Institute of Science Laboratory. Then, he received his B.A. in biology from Columbia in 1944. While in college, Lederberg did original research with colchicine and worked with Francis Ryan on Neurospora and E. coli. At age seventeen, he enlisted with the U.S. Navy and was placed in the V-12 program, serving as a naval hospital corpsman. While working towards his Ph.D., Lederberg continued his research on bacteria and E. coli. After receiving his Ph.D. in microbiology from Yale University in 1947, he joined the University of Wisconsin as assistant professor of genetics, and he expanded the University's bacteriology research. There, Lederberg first worked on salmonella strains with his graduate students. While with the University of Wisconsin, Lederberg won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1958. Lederberg concludes the interview with a discussion of the University environment during the McCarthy era, reflections on his career decisions, and thoughts on chemical information science. 
 Extent:  cassettes (450 mins.) 
 Subjects:  Lederberg, Joshua -- Interviews | University of Wisconsin -- Faculty | Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology | Biologists -- Biography | Biologists -- Interviews | Microbiologists -- Biography | Microbiologists -- Interviews | Biology | Microbiology | Nobel Prize winners -- Biography | Nobel Prize Winners -- Interviews | Neurospora | Escherichia coli | Cytochemistry | DNA | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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11Title:  Oral history interview with Frances M. Brodsky, 1995 August 21-23   
 Creator:  Brodsky, Frances M. (Frances Martha), 1955- | Novak, Steven J., 1947- | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Steven J. Novak at University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, Carliornia, 21-23 August 1995. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The process involved reformatting the front matter, adding a new abstract, replacing the table of contents, and replacing the index. The paragraph spacing and font of the body of the transcript were altered to conform to the standards of the Oral History Program at the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Frances M. Brodsky grew up in Princeton, New Jersey. Her father worked at ETS (Educational Testing Service), a job he began shortly after the company was founded. Her mother, an artist, was a professor at Rutgers and director of the Rutgers Center for Innovative Printmaking. Frances had a privileged and happy childhood and adolescence, complete with good friends, supportive parents, and an excellent education in Princeton, New Jersey, public schools. Brodsky's seventh-grade teacher got her interested in biology. Somehow, with primitive microscopes, the students did microscopy. Brodsky's parents encouraged her interest in science, hoping that she would become a medical doctor. She describes her most exciting high school teachers as those who taught biology, math, French, and Russian. In 1972 Brodsky entered Radcliffe, her mother's alma mater, where she majored in biochemical sciences. Although she cultivated an interest in medicine in deference to her parents, she eventually faced the reality that "I fundamentally was interested in the principle, but not the practice of medicine." Through the biochemistry mentoring program of the Boston-based universities, Brodsky was able to work for three summers in Paul D. Gottlieb's laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Still planning on medical school, Brodsky applied to M.D./Ph.D. programs but instead earned a Marshall Fellowship to study at Oxford University. There she worked in Walter F. Bodmer's laboratory, where she began her research on monoclonal antibodies. After earning her Ph.D., Brodsky attended Harvard Medical School for one semester, but the practice of medicine no longer interested her. Instead she undertook postdoctoral research on clathrin and HLA with Jack L. Strominger and later moved to Stanford University for further postdoctoral research with Peter Parham, her collaborator from her time in Oxford and her partner. Becton Dickinson Immunocytometry Systems then hired Brodsky as a program manager; there she ran her own lab, performing basic research in monoclonal antibodies and cell surface biology. She learned a great deal of cell biology by attending the ASCB Annual Meeting to meet others in the field, ("infiltrating" cell biology, as she thinks of it). After four years in industry, Brodsky made the then-uncommon decision to go back to the academic world, taking a position as assistant professor at University of California, San Francisco, where she is now a full professor. Brodsky discusses the years she spent working at Becton-Dickinson as the ideal way by which to switch from immunology to cell biology while expanding the clathrin antibody research. Throughout the interview Brodsky discusses the changing issues surrounding funding and how that affects her laboratory management, the recent decision by the Board of Regents of the University of California to abolish the affirmative action policy, and the ways scientific collaboration and controversies have affected her. The end of the interview includes a note regarding Brodsky's pseudonymously authored first mystery novel. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Brodsky, Frances M. -- (Frances Martha), -- 1955- -- Interviews | Parham, Peter, -- 1950- | Immunologists -- Biography | Immunologists -- Interviews | Women medical scientists -- Biography | Women medical scientists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medicine -- Research | Immunology -- Research | Women in science -- Biography | Women in science -- Interviews | Women in medicine -- Interviews | Women in medicine -- Biography | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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12Title:  Heads of a course of lectures on the natural history of the celestial bodies, the earth, the vegetable the atmosphere, and animal kingdoms [sic]: including the history of man, and the most effectual means of preserving health   
 Creator:  Moyes, Henry, 1749-1807 
 Publication:  s.n, Boston?, 1784?] 
 Notes:  An advertisement in the Massachusetts centinel, Boston, Nov. 6, 1784, states that Moyes is postponing his course of lectures in natural history until spring. This series was Moyes's second; a series of twenty-one lectures in "philosophical chemistry" was advertised in the Centinel of June 9, 1784. Cf. Bristol B5928. Signatures: [1]p8s. 
 Extent:  15, [1] p. ; 24 cm. (8vo) 
 Subjects:  Science -- Outlines, syllabi, etc. -- Early works to 1800 | Astronomy -- Outlines, syllabi, etc. -- Early works to 1800 | Natural history -- Outlines, syllabi, etc. -- Early works to 1800 | Biology -- Outlines, syllabi, etc. -- Early works to 1800

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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13Title:  Oral history interview with Konrad E. Bloch, 1993 March 22   
 Creator:  Bloch, Konrad Emil, 1912- | Bohning, James. J. | Chemical Heritage Foundation | American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 
 Notes:  Interview conducted by James J. Bohning at Harvard University . Interview sponsored by American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The interview begins with Konrad E. Bloch describing his childhood in Neisse, Germany, and his undergraduate education at Technische Hochschule in Munich. During a research assistantship in Davos, Switzerland, Bloch had his first encounter with the cholesterol molecule. He also produced and published three papers that Columbia University later accepted as partial fulfillment for a Ph.D. in biochemistry, which he earned in 1938. Bloch describes his teaching and research in biochemistry at Columbia and later at the University of Chicago, where he developed an interest in the mechanism of protein synthesis from amino acids. Throughout his career, Bloch's primary research interest was the biosynthesis of cholesterol. In 1954, he became Higgins Professor of Biochemistry at Harvard University and served as Chemistry Department Chairman for three years. He won the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology with Feodor Lynen in 1964 for his work on cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. Shortly before his retirement, he was appointed Professor of Science at the Harvard School of Public Health. Bloch closes the interview with some comments on nutrition research, blondes in Venetian Renaissance Art, the difference between biochemistry, molecular biology, and the Human Genome Project. 
 Extent:  cassettes (300 mins.) 
 Subjects:  Bloch, Konrad Emil, -- 1912- -- Interviews | Columbia University -- Faculty | Harvard University -- Faculty | University of Oxford -- Faculty | Human Genome Project | Biochemists -- Biography | Biochemists -- Interviews | Biochemistry | Biosynthesis | Cholesterol | Cholesterol -- Synthesis | Chemistry, Organic | Nobel prize winners -- Biography | Nobel Prize Winners -- Interviews | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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14Title:  Oral history interview with James A. Borowiec, 1993 September 14, 17, 23 and October 1, 9, 10   
 Creator:  Borowiec, James A., 1958- | Hathaway, Neil D. | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Neil D. Hathaway at New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. James Anthony Borowiec was born in Buffalo, New York, in 1958. Borowiec received his B.S. in Organic Chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1980. While there he worked in a chemistry lab during the school year. During one summer he worked for the U.S. Forest Service in Elko, Nevada. He matriculated into the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA, where he received his Ph.D. in 1986. Borowiec did a rotation in Paul D. Boyers laboratory, at the Molecular Biology Institute, and then in Jay D. Grallas laboratory. He worked on DNA supercoiling; lac; and footprinting technique. After receiving his Ph.D. he obtained a post-doc in the Department of Molecular Biology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. There he worked in Jerard Hurwitzs lab, studying SV40 per se and as a model of human DNA replication. In 1989 he was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry at New York University Medical Center in New York City. His work continues there, encompassing over the years an interest in replication of linear DNA; flaws in C. Richard Wobbes discovery of SSB DNA; T-antigen; ARS; and particularly bovine papillomavirus. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Borowiec, James A., -- 1958- | University of California, Los Angeles. -- Molecular Biology Institute -- Faculty | Molecular biologists -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Interviews | Geneticists -- Interviews | Geneticists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Molecular biology -- Research | Cytology -- Research | DNA -- Research | Genetics -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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15Title:  Oral history interview with Daniel S. Kessler, 2003 June 13, 16, and 17   
 Creator:  Kessler, Daniel S., (Solomon), 1964- | Van Benschoten, William | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by William Van Benschoten at University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 13, 16, and 17 June 2003. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Daniel S. Kessler was raised in Binghamton, New York, the youngest of three siblings. His mother was a public school teacher; his father taught at Binghamton University and was a published poet. Much of Kessler's life was spent within an academic world, with undergraduate and graduate student and faculty stopping by his family's home. The family also traveled when Kessler's father was on sabbatical, at one point providing Kessler with the opportunity to attend school in Hawaii, during which time he was exposed to the wonderment of science and, especially, marine biology. His time in public schools in Binghamton was typical, though being involved with the university allowed him access to outlets for his interest in music. Kessler matriculated at Cornell University for his undergraduate degree; it was not until he worked in Stanley A. Zahler's bacterial genetics laboratory that he decided to become a scientist. He then went on the Rockefeller University in New York City, New York, for his graduate studies. At Rockefeller, Kessler worked with James Darnell on interferon signaling proteins (the STATs) identifying the activation of STATs in response to interferons, the STAT complex, and its regulation; during this time he also had the opportunity to learn structural biology at Oxford University in Anthony R. Rees's laboratory as part of a summer exchange program and to attend Ronald McKay's summer course in neurobiology at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Following his Ph.D., Kessler decided to pursue postdoctoral research in developmental biology on the regulation of the mesoderm and endoderm germ layers by the transformation growth factor beta signaling molecule, Vgl, with Douglas A. Melton at Harvard University. He then accepted a faculty position at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine to work on the control of mesoderm and endoderm germ layer formation, the behavior of nodal signals during different stages of embryogenesis, and the formation of the Spemann organizer. Throughout his oral history interview Kessler discusses issues like scientific funding; the grant-writing process; the role of the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences award for his work; balancing family and career; his future projects incorporating other model systems into his research strategies for studying endoderm germ layer differentiation and dorsal body axis formation; and the history of science and his research. The interview ends a discussion of what Kessler thinks about being a principal investigator, and concludes with more on his father's career. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Kessler, Daniel S., -- (Solomon), -- 1964- -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Cellular signal transduction -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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17Title:  Oral history interview with Claire K. Schultz, 1997 July 9   
 Creator:  Schultz, Claire K., 1924- | Williams, Robert V. | Chemical Heritage Foundation 
 Notes:  Sponsored by the Eugene Garfield Foundation. Interview conducted by Robert V. Williams at Line Lexington, Pennsylvania. Claire K. Schultz begins the interview by discussing her childhood in south central Pennsylvania. Raised primarily by her father and grandmother, Schultz dreamed of becoming a doctor from a young age. Inspired by her grandmother's belief in her abilities, Schultz graduated from Juniata College in three years, and went on to medical school after a year of work in the Philadelphia State Hospital. Forced to leave medical school by the birth of her first child, Schultz went on to a job as a research assistant at the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, and then to Merck Sharp & Dohme [MSD], where she held her first position in a library. Schultz's interest in information retrieval began at Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratory, where she met Calvin Mooers. After talking to Mooers about his ideas regarding information retrieval, Schultz joined forces with Robert Ford, of MSD's Pharmacology Lab, and began a campaign to get an IBM 101 system at Merck Sharp & Dohme. Schultz wrote her master's thesis at Drexel University in Library Science on the MSD library system. While working at MSD, Schultz met John Mauchly, Eugene Garfield, and Peter Luhn. As one of the pioneer documentalists, Schultz worked at Sperry Rand Univac Corporation, and later at the Institute for the Advancement of Medical Communication, and taught various courses on information science at Drexel University and at the Medical College of Pennsylvania. Schultz closes her interview with anecdotes about her post-retirement hobbies, and her work as a computer consultant in a local elementary school. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Schultz, Claire, K., -- 1924- -- Interviews | Merck Sharp & Dohme | Sperry Rand Corporation. -- Univac Division | Drexel University | Librarians -- Biography | Librarians -- Interviews | Information storage and retrieval systems -- Chemistry | Chemistry -- Nomenclature -- History | Chemistry -- Abstracting and indexing -- History | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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18Title:  Oral history interview with Carolyn R. Bertozzi, 2003 August 17-18   
 Creator:  Bertozzi, Carolyn R., 1966- | Maestrejuan, Andrea R. | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Andrea R. Maestrejuan at University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Carolyn Bertozzi grew up in Lexington, Massachusetts, the second of three girls. Her father was a nuclear physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, her mother a secretary in MITs physics department. Carolyn was recruited to Harvard. She began as a biology major but in her second year took an organic chemistry class, which she loved, although she continued to take biology classes, she switched her major to chemistry. She was first in her class and eventually graduated summa cum laude, but Harvards chemistry department was exclusively male at the time. As a result, she went to a lab in the biochemistry department, where Joseph Grabowski, her teacher for a physical organic chemistry class, asked her to work for him during the summer. He convinced her to go to graduate school at University of California at Berkeley. At Berkeley, she joined Mark Bednarskis bioorganic chemistry laboratory to study carbohydrates. She wrote her doctoral dissertation on the synthesis of carbohydrate analogues for biological applications. Carolyn went to work in Steven Rosens cell biology laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco, for her postdoc. There she studied the role of carbohydrates in inflammation and leukocyte adhesion. After her postdoctoral work, she accepted an assistant professorship at the University of California at Berkeley and set up her own laboratory. She and Rosen also founded a private company, Thios Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Bertozzi, Carolyn R., -- 1966- | University of California, Berkeley -- Faculty | Women molecular biologists -- Biography | Women molecular biologists -- Interviews | Women in science -- Biography | Women in science -- Interviews | Women in medicine -- Biography | Women in medicine -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Molecular biology -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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19Title:  Oral history interview with Jonathan D. Goldberg, 2003 December 26 and 30 and 2004 January 5   
 Creator:  Goldberg, Jonathan Daniel | Van Benschoten, William | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by William Van Benschoten at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Jonathan D. Goldberg was born and raised in Hertfordshire, England. From the outset, it was clear to his parents that Goldberg was talented academically and so they encouraged him from a young age to attend university. He went through the British state-school system and advanced rapidly through his studies; his interest in science began early, choosing math, chemistry, and biology as his three subjects for A Level exams. An influential teacher and some interesting lessons on DNA led Goldberg to pursue biology for his undergraduate study. He attended the University of Liverpool, where he majored in biochemistry and had his first experience with intensive lab work. Despite his focus on microbiology while at Liverpool, Goldbergs own interests drew him to structural biology. He subsequently attended the Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine and received his Ph.D. under David M. Blow, in whose laboratory Goldberg enjoyed a great deal of scientific freedom; his graduate research focused on protein structure and x-ray crystallography. Drawn by John Kuriyans (Pew Scholar class of 1989) more experimental approach in structural biology, Goldberg joined Kuriyans lab at Rockefeller University for a postdoctoral position, researching the structural biology of cell signaling. James Rothman convinced him to take a position at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center at which he took a hands-on approach to his small lab. Goldberg's research has focused on intracellular transport, and he discusses how his research, which has resulted in a number of publications in prestigious journals, may further the field. In this interview, he also reflects on some broader themes that have affected his research and career, including funding, publishing, and, later in the interview, creativity, collaboration, and competition. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Goldberg, Jonathan Daniel | Blow, D. M. -- (David Merwyn) | Cytologists -- Biography | Cytologists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Cytology -- Research | Crystallography -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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20Title:  Oral history interview with Tatsuya Hirano, 2002 December 11-13   
 Creator:  Hirano, Tatsuya, 1960- | Maestrejuan, Andrea R. | Chemical Heritage Foundation | Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences | Pew Charitable Trusts 
 Notes:  This oral history is part of a series supported by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts based on the Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. This collection is an important resource for the history of biomedicine, recording the life and careers of young, distinguished biomedical scientists and of Pew Biomedical Scholar Advisory Committee members. Interview conducted by Andrea R. Maestrejuan at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. From the original collection at the Center for Oral History Research, UCLA Library, UCLA. The following oral history, originally processed at the UCLA Center for Oral History Research, has been reformatted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation. The text of the oral history remains unaltered; any inadvertent spelling or factual errors in the original manuscript have not been modified. The reformatted version and digital copies of the interview recordings are housed at the Othmer Library, Chemical Heritage Foundation. The original version and research materials remain at the Darling Library, University of California, Los Angeles and at the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Tatsuya Hirano was born and raised in Chiba, Japan. Hiranos childhood, according to him, was rather typical; he had an early interest in the arts (he liked drawing and carpentry). He excelled in school and decided to pursue a college education in science. He entered Kyoto University intending to study physics, but interest in contemporary advances in molecular biology pulled him much more in that direction. Hirano remained at Kyoto University and worked in Mitsuhiro Yanagidas laboratory on the genetics of chromosome structure in fission yeast. Since there were no postdoctoral positions available in Japan, and even fewer faculty positions, Hirano decided, like many of his fellow graduate students, to undertake a postdoctoral fellowship abroad. Wanting to broaden his experience in his field, Hirano decided that he wanted to work in the United States and chose to study with Timothy J. Mitchisonsomeone Hirano considered one of the brightest cell biologists of his ageat the University of California, San Francisco. Hirano worked on chromosome condensation and the condensin complex in Mitchisons lab, all the while adjusting to American life and culture. From there, he accepted a position at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York, where he continued his research on condensin and cohesion. 
 Extent:  digital, mp3 file. 
 Subjects:  Hirano, Tatsuya, -- 1960- | Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory -- Faculty | Molecular biologists -- Biography | Molecular biologists -- Interviews | Medical scientists -- Biography | Medical scientists -- Interviews | Medicine -- Research | Molecular biology -- Research | Oral histories | Interviews

 
Collection:  Science History Institute 
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