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Food Contamination prevention & control United States (25)
United States. Food and Drug Administration (23)
Food Safety (13)
Food adulteration and inspection (13)
Food Inspection standards United States (12)
Food Additives (11)
Food Contamination (10)
Food -- Safety measures (8)
Food Contamination legislation & jurisprudence United States (8)
Food contamination -- Congresses (8)
Nutrition (7)
Cooking (6)
Food Contamination prevention & control (6)
Food Inspection (6)
Food adulteration and inspection -- United States (6)
United States. -- Food and Drug Administration -- Rules and practice (6)
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Food -- Preservation (5)
Food Contamination prevention & control United States Statistics (5)
Food Inspection legislation & jurisprudence United States (5)
Food Safety methods United States (5)
Food additives -- Toxicology -- Congresses (5)
Food Contamination Congresses (4)
Food Industry standards United States (4)
Food Irradiation (4)
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Food Supply standards (4)
Food Supply standards United States (4)
Foodborne diseases -- United States (4)
Public Health United States (4)
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Developing Countries (3)
Drug Approval legislation & jurisprudence United States (3)
Drug Approval organization & administration United States (3)
Drugs -- Safety measures (3)
Flour (3)
Food -- Safety measures -- Government policy -- United States (3)
1Title:  Enhancing food safety: the role of the Food and Drug Administration   
 Creator:  Wallace, Robert B., 1942- | Oria, Maria. | Institute of Medicine (U.S.) Committee on the Review of Food and Drug Administration's Role in Ensuring Safe Food. | National Academies Press (U.S.) 
 Publication:  National Academies Press, Washington, D.C, c2010. 
 Notes:  Title from title caption (viewed on November 8, 2010). Includes bibliographical references. Recent outbreaks of illnesses traced to contaminated sprouts and lettuce illustrate the holes that exist in the system for monitoring problems and preventing foodborne diseases. Although it is not solely responsible for ensuring the safety of the nation's food supply, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees monitoring and intervention for 80 percent of the food supply. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's abilities to discover potential threats to food safety and prevent outbreaks of foodborne illness are hampered by impediments to efficient use of its limited resources and a piecemeal approach to gathering and using information on risks. Enhancing Food Safety: The Role of the Food and Drug Administration, a new book from the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council, responds to a congressional request for recommendations on how to close gaps in FDA's food safety systems. Enhancing Food Safety begins with a brief review of the Food Protection Plan (FPP), FDA's food safety philosophy developed in 2007. The lack of sufficient detail and specific strategies in the FPP renders it ineffectual. The book stresses the need for FPP to evolve and be supported by the type of strategic planning described in these pages. It also explores the development and implementation of a stronger, more effective food safety system built on a risk-based approach to food safety management. Conclusions and recommendations include adopting a risk-based decision-making approach to food safety; creating a data surveillance and research infrastructure; integrating federal, state, and local government food safety programs; enhancing efficiency of inspections; and more. Although food safety is the responsibility of everyone, from producers to consumers, the FDA and other regulatory agencies have an essential role. In many instances, the FDA must carry out this responsibility against a backdrop of multiple stakeholder interests, inadequate resources, and competing priorities. Of interest to the food production industry, consumer advocacy groups, health care professionals, and others, Enhancing Food Safety provides the FDA and Congress with a course of action that will enable the agency to become more efficient and effective in carrying out its food safety mission in a rapidly changing world. 
 Extent:  xii, 576 p. : digital, PDF file, ill. 
 Subjects:  Food -- Safety measures -- Government policy -- United States | United States. -- Food and Drug Administration | Food -- Safety regulations -- United States | United States. Food and Drug Administration | Food Supply United States | Food Contamination prevention & control United States | Health Policy United States | Resource Allocation United States | Risk Assessment United States | United States Government Agencies United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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2Title:  Food safety: overview of federal and state expenditures : report to congressional requesters   
 Creator:  United States General Accounting Office. 
 Publication:  United States General Accounting Office, Washington, D.C, 2001. 
 Notes:  Cover title. "February 2001." "GAO-01-177." 
 Extent:  iii, 83 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food Contamination economics United States | Food Inspection economics United States | United States. -- Food Safety and Inspection Service -- Appropriations and expenditures | United States. -- Food and Drug Administration -- Appropriations and expenditures | Food adulteration and inspection -- Economic aspects -- United States | Food adulteration and inspection -- Economic aspects -- United States -- States | Foodborne diseases -- United States -- Costs | Foodborne diseases -- United States -- Prevention -- Costs

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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3Title:  An evaluation of the food safety requirements of the Federal Purchase Ground Beef Program   
 Creator:  National Academies Press (U.S.) | National Research Council (U.S.) Committee on an Evaluation of the Food Safety Requirements of the Federal Purchase Ground Beef Program. 
 Publication:  National Academies Press, Washington, DC, c2010. 
 Notes:  Title from title caption (viewed on June 13, 2011). Includes bibliographical references. 
 Extent:  1 online resource (x, 33 pages) : illustrations 
 Subjects:  Federal Purchase Ground Beef Program (U.S.) -- Evaluation | Government purchasing of food -- Safety regulations -- United States | Beef -- Health aspects -- United States | Food -- Safety measures -- Government policy -- United States | Foodborne diseases -- United States -- Prevention | Food Safety United States | Food Inspection standards | Food Contamination prevention & control United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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4Title:  Outbreak alert!: analyzing foodborne outbreaks, 1998 to 2007 : closing the gaps in our federal food-safety net   
 Creator:  Smith DeWaal, Caroline. | Amanda Tian, Xuman. | Plunkett, David. | Center for Science in the Public Interest 
 Publication:  Center for Science in the Public Interest, Washington, DC, 2009. 
 Notes:  "Outbreak Alert! 2009 was researched and written by Caroline Smith DeWaal, Xuman Amanda Tian, and David Plunkett. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Michael F. Jacobson, Jacqlyn Witmer, Sarah Klein, and Ezequiel Zylberberg in preparing this report. We also thank the scientists in government public health agencies who provided information and inspiration for this report." Title from title caption (viewed on January 21, 2010). "December 2009." Includes bibliographical references (25-26 p.). In the United States, foodborne illness has been estimated to cause 5,000 deaths and 76 million illnesses per year. Responsibility for food safety is divided among at least a dozen federal agencies involved in monitoring, surveillance, inspection, enforcement, outbreak management, research, and education. Despite recent improvements and increased funding for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) significant gaps in the federal food-safety structure continue to put consumers at risk. To help fill one of these gaps, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) maintains a database of foodborne illness outbreaks that have been linked to specific foods, starting with outbreaks reported in 1990. This report analyzes a subset of that data. FINDINGS: Using data available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), CSPI identified a total of 4,638 outbreaks of illness linked to specific foods, involving 117,136 individual illnesses that occurred between 1998 and 2007. An outbreak involves two or more people sickened by the same food. The food categories most commonly linked to outbreaks during this ten-year period were: * Seafood: 838 outbreaks involving 7,298 cases of illness * Produce: 684 outbreaks involving 26,735 cases of illness * Poultry: 538 outbreaks involving 13,498 cases of illness * Beef: 428 outbreaks involving 9,824 cases of illness * Pork: 200 outbreaks involving 4,934 cases of illness Overall, fewer outbreaks identified by state officials were investigated fully in 2007 to identify both a food and a pathogen than in previous years, which are the only outbreaks described in this report. As a portion of overall outbreak reports, fully-investigated outbreaks declined to 34 percent in 2007 from a high of 44 percent in 2001. RECOMMENDATIONS: Congress should pass, and the Obama Administration should implement, legislation that will help to modernize our nation's food safety program. Legislation currently before Congress would greatly enhance outbreak surveillance-systems and coordination between the CDC and the states to improve the collection, analysis, reporting, and usefulness of information on foodborne illness. The legislation would also modernized FDA's food safety program (responsible for seafood, produce, and most processed foods) to implement an integrated, system-wide approach to preventing foodborne illnesses and outbreaks. The new program assigns clear responsibilities to food producers and processors, oversight by federal food safety agencies, and effective tools and resources for detecting and removing unsafe food from the market. It would increase food inspections for FDA-regulated products; requires companies to identify hazards specific to the foods they produce and implement written food safety plans to control those hazards. The bills also would give FDA the authority to issue mandatory recalls of contaminated foods and would authorize tougher penalties for negligent processors. While the legislation will provide useful new tools, it is vital that the agencies request and Congress support adequate funding for food safety programs at both FDA and USDA. i 
 Extent:  26 p. : digital, PDF file, ill., charts. 
 Subjects:  Foodborne Diseases prevention & control United States | Food Contamination legislation & jurisprudence United States | Food Contamination prevention & control United States | Food Contamination statistics & numerical data United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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5Title:  Managing food safety practices from farm to table: workshop summary   
 Creator:  Pray, Leslie. | Yaktine, Ann. | Institute of Medicine (U.S.) Food Forum. | National Research Council (U.S.) Food and Nutrition Board. | Institute of Medicine (U.S.) | National Academies Press (U.S.) 
 Publication:  National Academies Press, Washington, D.C, c2009. 
 Notes:  Title from title caption (viewed on January 29, 2010) Includes bibliographical references. Legal regulations and manufacturers' monitoring practices have not been enough to prevent contamination of the national food supply and protect consumers from serious harm. In addressing food safety risks, regulators could perhaps better ensure the quality and safety of food by monitoring food production not just at a single point in production but all along the way, from farm to table. Recognizing the troubled state of food safety, the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Food Forum met in Washington, DC, on September 9, 2008, to explore the management of food safety practices from the beginning of the supply chain to the marketplace. 
 Extent:  x, 106 p. : digital, PDF file, ill. 
 Subjects:  Food contamination -- Prevention -- Government policy -- United States | Foodborne diseases -- Prevention -- Government policy -- United States | Food -- Safety measures -- Government policy -- United States | Food Contamination prevention & control United States | Food Contamination legislation & jurisprudence United States | Foodborne Diseases prevention & control United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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6Title:  Food safety updated: developing tools for a more science- and risk-based approach   
 Creator:  Rosner, David. | Milbank Memorial Fund | Resources for the Future 
 Publication:  Milbank Memorial Fund, New York, NY, [2003] 
 Notes:  Cover title. "July 2003." Includes bibliographical references (p. 27-30). 
 Extent:  32 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food Contamination prevention & control United States | Food Inspection standards United States | Consumer Product Safety United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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7Title:  Food safety on the farm: federal programs and legislative action   
 Creator:  Johnson, Renée. | Library of Congress Congressional Research Service. 
 Publication:  Congressional Research Service, Washington, D.C.], [2010] 
 Notes:  Title from title caption (viewed November 22, 2010). "October 5, 2010." Includes bibliographical references. There is interest in examining on-farm practices, given continued major outbreaks of foodborne illness involving both domestically produced and imported foods. An example is the case in April-July 2008, when more than 1,000 persons in more than 40 states and Canada were found to be infected with the same unusual strain of bacteria (Salmonella Saintpaul). Most recently, in May 2010, a large-scale recall of more than 550 million shell eggs has been linked to concerns about a nationwide increase in Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections. The lead federal food safety agencies are the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) within the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), which regulates major species of meat and poultry and some egg products, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which regulates virtually all other foods. Generally, these agencies' regulatory oversight of foods begins after the farm gate, at slaughter establishments and food handling and manufacturing facilities. However, various activities of these and other federal agencies involved in assuring the safety of the food supply can, and do, have an impact on how farms and ranches raise food commodities. 
 Extent:  22 p. : digital, PDF file. 
 Subjects:  Food Safety methods United States | Food Industry legislation & jurisprudence United States | Foodborne Diseases prevention & control United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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8Title:  Driving the fox from the henhouse: improving oversight of food safety at the FDA and USDA   
 Creator:  Donaghy, Timothy. | Grifo, Francesca. | Halpern, Michael. | Moline, Heidi. | Union of Concerned Scientists 
 Publication:  Union of Concerned Scientists, Cambridge, Mass, [2010] 
 Notes:  Title from title caption (viewed Nov. 5, 2010). "The Scientific Integrity Program of the Union of Concerned Scientists." "September 2010." Includes bibliographical references (p. 32-36). The study provides evidence that political interference with science is significant in the food safety system, with consequences for public health. The results reveal a food safety system where special interests and public officials all too often inhibit the ability of government scientists and inspectors to protect the food supply. Our survey results indicate that political interference in science can range from explicit, but rare, rewriting of scientific conclusions to subtler but more common abuses, such as selective use of data or edits to agency documents. Survey respondents also indicated that the public health had been harmed by corporate influence over agency actions - either through withholding needed information or by lobbying to withdraw or modify certain agency actions. The survey results paint a complex picture of the federal food safety system. On the one hand, the reported levels political and corporate interference at both the USDA and the FDA are troublingly high, and many FDA respondents reported insufficient resources to meet their mission. Too many agency scientists report that they are not free to discuss their findings with the media or to speak out about their agency's work. In other respects, survey respondents felt that the agencies were moving in the right direction and were acting effectively to protect the public health. 
 Extent:  v, 60 p. : digital, PDF file. 
 Subjects:  Food Contamination legislation and jurisprudence United States | Food Contamination prevention & control United States | Food Inspection legislation and jurisprudence United States | Food Supply legislation and jurisprudence United States | Health Care Surveys statistics & numerical data United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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9Title:  A recipe for stronger food safety testing programs: findings & recommendations for the APHL food safety laboratory capacity assessment project   
 Creator:  Banfield-Capers, Stacey Y. | Association of Public Health Laboratories (U.S.) 
 Publication:  Association of Public Health Laboratories, Washington, D.C, [2003] 
 Notes:  "April 2003." Written by Stacey Y. Banfield-Capers ... [et al.]. 
 Extent:  1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 28 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food Contamination analysis United States Statistics | Food Contamination prevention & control United States Statistics

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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10Title:  Journal of food safety   
 Publication:  Food & Nutrition Press, Westport, Conn,  
 Extent:  v. ill. 23 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food adulteration and inspection -- Periodicals | Food contamination -- Periodicals | Food -- Analysis -- Periodicals | Food -- Microbiology -- Periodicals

 
Collection:  Linda Hall Library 
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11Title:  School meal programs: more systematic development of specifications could improve the safety of foods purchased through USDA's commodity program : report to the Ranking Member, Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives   
 Creator:  Shames, Lisa. | United States Government Accountability Office. 
 Publication:  U.S. Govt. Accountability Office, Washington, DC], [2011] 
 Notes:  Title from PDF title page (viewed on June 30, 2011). "GAO-11-376." "May 2011." Through its commodity program, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides commodity foods at no cost to schools taking part in the national school meals programs. Commodities include raw ground beef, cheese, poultry, and fresh produce. Like federal food safety agencies, the commodity program has taken steps designed to reduce microbial contamination that can result in severe illness. GAO was asked to review (1) the extent to which the program's purchasing specifications related to microbial contamination differ from federal regulations, (2) the extent to which specifications for raw ground beef differ from those imposed by some other large purchasers, and (3) examples of schools' practices to help ensure that food is not contaminated. GAO compared the program's purchasing specifications to federal regulations for food sold commercially, gathered information from seven large purchasers of ground beef, and interviewed officials in 18 school districts in five states, selected in part because of their purchasing practices. For 7 of the approximately 180 commodity foods offered to schools, USDA's commodity program has established purchasing specifications with respect to microbial contamination that are more stringent than the federal regulations for the same foods in the commercial marketplace. For example, the commodity program will not purchase ground beef that tests positive for Salmonella bacteria, while federal regulations for commercially available ground beef tolerate the presence of a certain amount of Salmonella. Program officials told GAO that more-stringent specifications are needed for certain foods they purchase because they go to populations, such as very young children, at a higher risk for serious complications from foodborne illnesses. However, the program has not developed more-stringent specifications for some pathogens and foods that have been associated with foodborne illness, such as raw, whole chickens cut into eight pieces that the program provides to schools. Program officials told GAO they selected products for more-stringent specifications based on their views of the safety risk associated with different types of food; developed these specifications through informal consultation with a variety of groups; and did not document the process they used. The commodity program's purchasing specifications related to microbial contamination for raw ground beef at various processing stages are generally similar to those of some other large purchasers. The specifications used by both the commodity program and these large purchasers are more stringent than federal regulations. USDA's commodity program has several purchasing specifications related to microbial contamination for raw ground beef production, process oversight, and testing. For example, the program requires beef suppliers to take actions to reduce the level of pathogens at least twice while beef carcasses are processed. Some large purchasers of raw ground beef have purchasing specifications similar to the commodity program, although they differ in certain details. For example, of the seven large purchasers that GAO interviewed, five said they require their beef suppliers to take between two and seven actions to reduce pathogen levels on beef carcasses. While all school districts must follow certain food safety practices to participate in federally funded school meal programs, school districts that GAO interviewed have also implemented a number of additional food safety practices. Federal regulations require school districts to develop written food safety plans and to obtain food safety inspections of their schools, among other things. In addition, some of the school districts GAO interviewed have established purchasing specifications related to microbial contamination or food safety for food they purchase in the commercial marketplace, among other things. Nevertheless, few of the district officials GAO interviewed were aware that the commodity program's purchasing specifications for seven products are more stringent than federal regulatory requirements. Officials from half of the districts GAO interviewed said that greater knowledge of these differences would affect their future purchasing decisions by enabling them to make more informed choices. GAO recommends, among other things, that USDA strengthen its oversight of food purchased by its commodity program, by establishing a more systematic and transparent process to determine whether additional specifications should be developed related to microbial contamination. USDA generally agreed with GAO's recommendations and provided technical comments. 
 Extent:  ii, 35 p. : digital, PDF file 
 Subjects:  Food Services organization & administration United States | Food Safety | Schools

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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12Title:  Nutritional and toxicological aspects of food safety   
 Creator:  Friedman, Mendel. | Symposium on Food Safety: Metabolism and Nutrition (1982 : San Francisco, Calif.) | Pacific Conference on Chemistry and Spectroscopy (1982 : San Francisco, Calif.) 
 Publication:  Plenum, New York, c1984. 
 Notes:  "Based on the symposium on Food Safety: Metabolism and Nutrition, sponsored by the Pacific Conference on Chemistry and Spectroscopy, held October 27-29, 1982, in San Francisco, California"--T.p. verso. Includes bibliographical references and index. 
 Extent:  xii, 584 p. : ill. ; 26 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food Contamination Congresses | Diet Congresses

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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13Title:  Terrorist threats to food: guidance for establishing and strengthening prevention and response systems   
 Creator:  World Health Organization Food Safety Department 
 Publication:  Food Safety Department, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, c2002. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references. 
 Extent:  46 p. : ill. ; 30 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food Contamination prevention & control | Terrorism prevention & control | Food Industry standards | Food Supply standards | Bioterrorism prevention & control | Disease Outbreaks prevention & control | Civil Defense methods | Terrorism -- Prevention | Food contamination -- Prevention | Biological warfare -- Prevention | Epidemics -- Prevention | Food industry and trade -- Security measures

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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14Title:  Food safety: FDA has begun to take action to address weaknesses in food safety research, but gaps remain : [letter to Brad Miller, Chairman, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight Committee on Science and Technology House of Representatives]   
 Creator:  Shames, Lisa. | United States Congress. House. Committee on Science and Technology. Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight. | United States Government Accountability Office. 
 Publication:  United States Government Accountability Office, Washington, D.C, [2010] 
 Notes:  "April 23, 2010." "GAO-10-182R." Title from title caption (viewed on May 2, 2011). Includes bibliographical references. 
 Extent:  23 p. : digital, PDF file. 
 Subjects:  United States. -- Food and Drug Administration -- Rules and practice | Food industry and trade -- United States -- Safety measures | Food supply -- United States -- Safety measures | United States. Food and Drug Administration | Food Inspection standards United States Statistics | Food Contamination prevention & control United States Statistics

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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15Title:  Food safety: contaminants and toxins   
 Creator:  D'Mello, J. P. Felix 
 Publication:  CABI Pub, Wallingford, Oxon, UK, Cambridge, MA, c2003. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographic references and index. 
 Extent:  xvi, 452 p. : ill. ; 26 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food -- Toxicology | Food -- Safety measures

 
Collection:  Linda Hall Library 
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16Title:  Food safety: selected countries' systems can offer insights into ensuring import safety and responding to foodborne illness : report to congressional requesters   
 Creator:  Shames, Lisa. | United States Government Accountability Office. 
 Publication:  United States Government Accountability Office, Washington, D.C, [2008] 
 Notes:  Title from cover. "June 2008." "GAO-08-794." Includes bibliographical references. 
 Extent:  57 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food -- Safety measures | Food adulteration and inspection -- United States | Foodborne diseases -- United States | Food Inspection standards United States | Food Contamination prevention & control United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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17Title:  Guidelines for the scientific review of enteral food products for special medical purposes   
 Creator:  Talbot, John M. | Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (U.S.) 
 Publication:  American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition], Silver Spring, MD, 1991. 
 Notes:  An exact reproduction of the report prepared and published by the Life Sciences Research Office, Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, in December 1990. "Prepared for Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC 20204, under FDA Contract No. 223-88-2124, Task Order No. 6."--t.p. Includes bibliographical references (p. 153S-173S). 
 Extent:  viii p., p. 99S-174S, [28] p. ; 28 cm. 
 Subjects:  Enteral feeding -- Equipment and supplies -- Testing | Nutrition -- Research | Medical supplies -- Testing | Enteral Nutrition | Food, Formulated

 
Collection:  College of Physicians of Philadelphia 
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18Title:  Food protection plan: an integrated strategy for protecting the nation's food supply   
 Creator:  United States Food and Drug Administration. 
 Publication:  United States Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Md, 2007. 
 Notes:  Cover title "November 2007." 
 Extent:  25 p. ; col. ill. 28 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food -- Safety measures -- United States | Food Supply legislation & jurisprudence United States | Food Handling standards United States | Food Contamination prevention & control United States

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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19Title:  Health implications of acrylamide in food: report of a joint FAO/WHO consultation, WHO Headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland, 25-27 June 2002   
 Creator:  FAO/WHO Consultation on Health Implications of Acrylamide in Food (2002 : Geneva, Switzerland) | World Health Organization Food Safety Programme. | Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 
 Publication:  Food Safety Programme, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, c2002. 
 Notes:  "Issued by the World Health Organization in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations." 
 Extent:  35 p. ; 30 cm. 
 Subjects:  Acrylamide adverse effects Congresses | Food Contamination analysis Congresses | Food Handling Congresses | Risk Assessment Congresses | Food contamination -- Congresses | Acrylamide -- Congresses | Food handling -- Congresses

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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20Title:  The Health of Food-Handlers: A Cooperative Study by The Department of Health, The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company and The American Museum of Safety   
 Creator:  Harris, Louis I. | Dublin, Louis Israel, 1882-1969 
 Publication:  Department of Health, New York, 1917. 
 Notes:  Discusses the health of those in the food industry. Department of Health conducted 1,980 physical examinations. Physical defects and disease were recorded in the examination. The questions asked in the examination are givin in the back. The conclusion gives suggestions on how to lessen common problems that people in the food industry face. 
 Extent:  22 p. : charts ; 24 cm. 
 Subjects:  Food Safety | Workplace | Physical Examination

 
Collection:  College of Physicians of Philadelphia 
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