Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine
Search Results for Metaphors andanalogies in the full text  [X]
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1Title:  The nature and culture of the human body: Lampeter multidisciplinary essays   
 Creator:  Mitchell, Peter, 1968- 
 Publication:  Trivium Publications, University of Wales, Lampeter, Lampeter, Ceredigion, Wales, c2007. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references. 
 Extent:  xxxii, 267 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm. 
 Subjects:  Body, Human (Philosophy) | Body, Human -- Religious aspects | Body, Human -- Social aspects

 
Collection:  Newberry Library 
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2Title:  Information and space: Analogies and metaphors   
 Creator:  Van Acker, Wouter. | Uyttenhove, Pieter. 
 Publication:  Baltimore, Md, 2012. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references. 
 Extent:  p. [257]-470. : ill., facsims., ports. ; 23 cm. 
 Subjects:  Knowledge management | Information storage and retrieval systems

 
Collection:  American Philosophical Society 
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3Title:  Composing the world: harmony in the Medieval Platonic cosmos   
 Creator:  Hicks, Andrew J. (Andrew James), 1978- 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references (pages 291-308) and index. "We can hear the universe!" This was the triumphant proclamation at a February 2016 press conference announcing that the Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) had detected a "transient gravitational-wave signal." What LIGO heard in the morning hours of September 14, 2015 was the vibration of cosmic forces unleashed with mind-boggling power across a cosmic medium of equally mind-boggling expansiveness: the transient ripple of two black holes colliding more than a billion years ago. The confirmation of gravitational waves sent tremors through the scientific community, but the public imagination was more captivated by the sonic translation of the cosmic signal, a sound detectable only through an act of carefully attuned listening. As astrophysicist Szabolcs Marka remarked, "Until this moment, we had our eyes on the sky and we couldn't hear the music. The skies will never be the same." Taking in hand this current "discovery" that we can listen to the cosmos, Andrew Hicks argues that sound--and the harmonious coordination of sounds, sources, and listeners--has always been an integral part of the history of studying the cosmos. Composing the World charts one constellation of musical metaphors, analogies, and expressive modalities embedded within a late-ancient and medieval cosmological discourse: that of a cosmos animated and choreographed according to a specifically musical aesthetic. The specific historical terrain of Hicks' discussion centers upon the world of twelfth-century philosophy, and from there he offers a new intellectual history of the role of harmony in medieval cosmological discourse, a discourse which itself focused on the reception and development of Platonism. Hicks illuminates how a cosmological aesthetics based on the "music of the spheres" both governed the moral, physical, and psychic equilibrium of the human, and assured the coherence of the universe as a whole. With a rare convergence of musicological, philosophical, and philological rigor, Hicks presents a narrative tour through medieval cosmology with reflections on important philosophical movements along the way, raising connections to Cartesian dualism, Uexküll's theoretical biology, and Deleuze and Guattari's musically inspired language of milieus and (de)territorialization. Hicks ultimately suggests that the models of musical cosmology popular in late antiquity and the twelfth century are relevant to our modern philosophical and scientific undertakings. Impeccably researched and beautifully written, Composing the World will resonate with a variety of readers, and it encourages us to rethink the role of music and sound within our greater understanding of the universe-- 
 Extent:  xix, 321 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm. 
 Subjects:  Music -- Philosophy and aesthetics -- History -- 500-1400 | Harmony of the spheres | Harmony of the spheres | Music Philosophy and aesthetics | History

 
Collection:  Newberry Library 
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4Title:  Inquiries into medieval philosophy: a collection in honor of Francis P. Clarke   
 Creator:  Ross, James F., 1931- | Clarke, Francis P. (Francis Palmer), b. 1895 
 Publication:  Greenwood Pub. Co, Westport, Conn, [c1971] 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references. 
 Extent:  xii, 329 p. 23 cm. 
 Subjects:  Philosophy, Medieval

 
Collection:  Newberry Library 
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5Title:  Blood, sweat, and tears: the changing concepts of physiology from antiquity into early modern Europe   
 Creator:  Horstmanshoff, H. F. J. | King, Helen, 1957- | Zittel, Claus. 
 Publication:  Brill, Leiden, Boston, 2012. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references and indexes. 
 Extent:  xxvi, 772 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. 
 Subjects:  Medicine, Ancient | Medicine -- History | Physiology -- History | Physiology history Europe | Physiological Phenomena Europe

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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6Title:  New cyclopaedia of illustrations adapted to Christian teaching: embracing mythology, analogies, legends, parables, emblems, metaphors, similies, allegories proverbs ; classic, historic, and religious anecodtes, etc   
 Creator:  Foster, Elon 
 Publication:  Palmer, New York, c1870. 
 Extent:  704 p. ; 25 cm. 
 Subjects:  Quotations, English | Homiletical illustrations

 
Collection:  Library Company 
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7Title:  New cyclopedia of illustrations, adapted to Christian teaching: embracing mythology, analogies, legends, parables, emblems, metaphors, similies, allegories, proverbs ; classic, historic and religious anecdotes   
 Creator:  Foster, Elon. 
 Publication:  W.c. Palmer, New York, 1870. 
 Extent:  704 p. ; 25 cm. 
 Subjects:  Anecdotes

 
Collection:  Library Company 
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8Title:  Currents of archival thinking   
 Creator:  Eastwood, Terry, 1943- | MacNeil, Heather. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references and index. 
 Extent:  xiii, 254 pages ; 24 cm 
 Subjects:  Archives -- Philosophy | Archives | Archivists

 
Collection:  Drexel University 
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9Title:  Currents of archival thinking   
 Creator:  Eastwood, Terry, 1943- | MacNeil, Heather. 
 Publication:  Libraries Unlimited, Santa Barbara, Calif, c2010. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references and index. 
 Extent:  xiii, 254 p. ; 24 cm. 
 Subjects:  Archives | Archives -- Philosophy | Archivists

 
Collection:  Johns Hopkins University Library 
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10Title:  Light and death: figuration in Spenser, Kepler, Donne, Milton   
 Creator:  Anderson, Judith H. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references (pages 229-302) and index. "Death, light, figuration and, especially, analogical expressions of figuration, are the primary subjects of this book. They generate associated interests: the relation of literature and science, the methodology of thought and argument, and the processes of narrative, discovery, and interpretation. Creativity, optics, rhetoric, and language are focal as well"-- 
 Extent:  vii, 316 pages ; 24 cm 
 Subjects:  English literature -- Early modern, 1500-1700 -- History and criticism | Death in literature | Metaphor in literature | Analogy in literature | Allegory | Allegory | Analogy in literature | Death in literature | English literature Early modern | Metaphor in literature | Criticism, interpretation, etc

 
Collection:  Newberry Library 
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11Title:  Correspondence: to Morley Roberts, 1916-1923   
 Creator:  Bayliss, William MaddockSir, 1860-1924 
 Notes:  Bayliss's letters show an ongoing dialogue between him and Morley Roberts on topics in human physiology, especially concerning the phenomenon of inhibition (in the context of the heart, the intestines) and in relation to that, Roberts's conception of shock. The letters begin with a reference to Roberts having written in response to Bayliss's book, presumably Principles of general physiology. Roberts regularly sent Bayliss copies of his scientific essays, including his book Warfare in the human body. Bayliss engages in detailed discussions about the questions raised; his responses include reflection on Roberts's use of certain analogies, or metaphors in his argumentation. Bayliss expresses appreciation that Roberts sets the work on specialized problems into a wider scientific context (25 September 1920). References made to the work of other scientists include Paul Ehrlich, H. R. Dean, J. George Adami, and W. Langdon-Brown. The exchanges are mostly limited to scientific questions, but with some personal touches. In response to Roberts's sending him a copy of his book of poems War lyrics, Bayliss demurs that he is no judge of poetry but comments that he liked some of them (18 October 1918). Letters occasionally have pencil annotations by Roberts; and the following pencil notes by him are found on versos: a stricken passage that refers to Goethe and Schiller (21 December 1917); and an itemized list, including titles of articles, which is possibly a draft list of chapters for the above mentioned book (27 April 1918). 
 Extent:  25 
Collection:  University of Pennsylvania 
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12Title:  The mirror in medieval and early modern culture: specular reflections   
 Creator:  Frelick, Nancy M. | Horace Howard Furness Memorial Fund | Horace Howard Furness Memorial Library (University of Pennsylvania) 
 Notes:  This volume examines the intersections between material and metaphorical mirrors in medieval and early modern culture. Mirrors have always fascinated humankind. They collapse ordinary distinctions, making visible what is normally invisible, and promising access to hidden realities. Yet, these liminal objects also point to the limitations of human perception, knowledge, and wisdom. In this interdisciplinary volume, specialists in medieval and early modern science, cultural and political history, as well as art history, philosophy, and literature come together to explore the intersections between material and metaphysical mirrors in Europe and the Islamic world. During the time periods studied here, various technologies were transforming the looking glass as an optical device, scientific instrument, and aesthetic object, making it clearer and more readily available, though it remained a rare and precious commodity. While technical innovations spawned new discoveries and ways of seeing, belief systems were slower to change, as expressed in the natural sciences, mystical writings, literature, and visual culture. Mirror metaphors based on analogies established in the ancient world still retained significant power and authority, perhaps especially when related to Aristotelian science, the medieval speculum tradition, religious iconography, secular imagery, Renaissance Neoplatonism, or spectacular Baroque engineering, artistry, and self-fashioning. Mirror effects created through myths, metaphors, rhetorical strategies, or other devices could invite self-contemplation and evoke abstract or paradoxical concepts. Whether faithful or deforming, specular reflections often turn out to be ambivalent and contradictory: sometimes sources of illusion, sometimes reflections of divine truth, mirrors compel us to question the very nature of representation. Includes bibliographical references and index. 
 Extent:  xi, 293 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm 
 Subjects:  Symbolism -- Europe -- History | Symbolism -- Islamic countries -- History | Mirrors

 
Collection:  University of Pennsylvania 
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13Title:  Blood, sweat, and tears: the changing concepts of physiology from antiquity into early modern Europe   
 Creator:  Horstmanshoff, H. F. J. | King, Helen, 1957- | Zittel, Claus. 
 Publication:  Brill, Leiden, Boston, 2012. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references and indexes. 
 Extent:  xxvi, 772 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. 
 Subjects:  Medicine, Ancient | Medicine -- History | Physiology -- History

 
Collection:  University of Oklahoma 
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14Title:  Blake and the idea of the book   
 Creator:  Viscomi, Joseph, 1952- 
 Publication:  Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J, ©1993. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references (pages 429-137) and index. In this highly innovative "history of the book," Joseph Viscomi drastically revises our understanding of William Blake as he explores the technology behind the Illuminated Books. By using facsimiles created in his own studio, Viscomi, an experienced printmaker, offers the most complete explanation of how the illuminated plates were made, how Blake's techniques compared to other eighteenth-century print technologies, and how the plates were printed and the impressions colored. His analysis of these procedures reveals that the Illuminated Books were produced in small editions and not, as is assumed, one copy at a time and by commission. These new facts of production redefine such basic concepts in Blake scholarship as "style," "period," "intention," and "difference," which in turn alter the dates of nearly all copies of all the Illuminated Books and refute current approaches to reading and editing Blake. By placing Blake's modes of production in their historical, technical, and aesthetic context, Viscomi enables us to see how profoundly Blake's metaphors, images, symbols, themes, and analogies are grounded in graphic execution, while exposing a wealth of connections between material processes and larger meanings throughout the works. 
 Extent:  xxvi, 453 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm 
 Subjects:  Blake, William, -- 1757-1827 -- Criticism and interpretation | Prints -- Technique | Illustration of books -- England

 
Collection:  Library Company 
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15Title:  Organic memory: history and the body in the late nineteenth & early twentieth centuries   
 Creator:  Otis, Laura, 1961- 
 Publication:  University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, c1994. 
 Notes:  Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-286) and index. 
 Extent:  xiii, 297 p. ; 24 cm. 
 Subjects:  Psychophysiology history | Memory | Literature, Modern | Social Identification | Literature and history | Literature, Modern -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Literature, Modern -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Heredity in literature | Race in literature | Identity (Psychology) in literature | Memory | Heredity | Nationalism

 
Collection:  NY Academy of Medicine 
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