Working Groups

Practices and Social Relations of Obstetrical Objects

Inspired by feminist science studies on ontology (such as new materialisms), this working group will investigate the theory, practices, and social relations that produce specific obstetrical objects in a variety of spaces. We shift focus away from theoretical conceptions of the reproductive body and objects to how these objects were enacted in practice in different situations. In doing so, we seek to uncover the instability of objects and the reproductive body. This approach requires paying particular attention to the practices producing and surrounding these objects. Each of the eight workshops, therefore, will center on an obstetrical object in order to interrogate its instability and entanglement with the reproductive body in different contexts. We encourage conversations that explore the material semiotics of obstetrical objects—the entanglements of materiality, discourse, practices, and the social. 
 
Meetings will be held monthly during the 2020-2021 academic year.
 
To join this working group, click "Request group membership" at right. You will receive instructions for participating online or in person.
 

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  • Scottie Buehler

    Scottie Buehler (CPM/cPhD) is a midwife turned historian of medicine. After earning her BA in Sociology and Women and Gender Studies from the University of Texas at Austin, she became licensed as a Certified Professional Midwife and founded and operated a homebirth midwifery practice in Austin, Texas. Currently, she is a doctoral candidate in the history of science, technology, and medicine field at UCLA. Scottie’s dissertation applies practice and object-oriented methodologies to the study of midwifery training programs in the second half of eighteenth-century France. She was a Research Fellow in the Consortium in 2019.

     

  • Martina Schlünder

    Martina Schlünder (MD/PhD) is a research scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Germany. From 2015-18 she held a Marie Curie Fellowship at the Technoscience Research Unit at Women and Gender Studies Institute at University of Toronto with a project on the technoscientific turn in the history of reproduction in the 20th and 21st centuries. In the working group she is particularly interested in the exploration of the material culture of experimental systems in obstetrical research at the beginning of the 20th century (in Germany) when obstetrics turned away from anatomical based research and started to conceptualize delivery as a physiological process.

     

Upcoming Meetings (all times Eastern)

There are no currently scheduled upcoming events.

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